Welcome Guest! To enable all features please try to register or login.

Notification

Icon
Error

OK
What is the best 3D TV for Gaming?
newoutlaw929
#1 Posted : January 29, 2011 7:35:33 AM(UTC)
newoutlaw929


Lunatic
Posts: 121
Hi guys, my Sony 46"LCD died after only 3 years02 So now I am in need of a new TV. Just wondering if you guys had any professional opinions on what to buy for a 3D TV. Plasma or LCD or LED?
mordinxx
#2 Posted : January 29, 2011 9:57:39 AM(UTC)
mordinxx


Insane
Posts: 687
Here's my UN-professional opinion. I'd stay away from 3D, with the need to use glasses I still think it's too gimmicky yet. I don't think it will take off until they get rid of the need for glasses in the next few yrs.

Plasmas have the best picture (colour saturation and blacks) but use a lot of power compared to LCD/LED. The glass front tends to be back for reflections in bright locations. The have some down a lot in the last few months.

LED is still a LCD TV, only using a LED back light and nor the tube. (Are you sure your old one just doesn't need a new back light tube?) LEDs use even less power then reg LCDs and have better colour saturation and blacks.

If I was buying I would go with the largest non-3D LED I could afford.
Sileed
#4 Posted : January 29, 2011 10:26:23 AM(UTC)
Sileed


Therapeutic Supervisors
Posts: 1,213
Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 4 time(s) in 4 post(s)
Pretty much what he said, minus the spelling/grammar mistakes 14
thryon
#5 Posted : January 29, 2011 10:59:03 AM(UTC)
thryon


Therapeutic Supervisors
Posts: 3,528
Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 4 time(s) in 4 post(s)
If you are getting an LED, make sure you get a local dimming LED and not and Edge Lit LED.
thryon
#6 Posted : January 29, 2011 11:03:23 AM(UTC)
thryon


Therapeutic Supervisors
Posts: 3,528
Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 4 time(s) in 4 post(s)
Also to answer your question. If you only plan on doing 3D gaming on your 3DTV, then I would also agree to maybe hold off for another year or so. LG has just released a home based 3D technology that does away with the expensive 3D glasses. It still uses glasses, but can use cheap one similar to what you get when you go to the movies.

Glasses free TV are still half a decade away from being afordable on 40" TVs.
Silent Paradigm
#3 Posted : January 29, 2011 3:53:07 PM(UTC)
Silent Paradigm


Deranged
Posts: 291
Thanks: 7 times
Was thanked: 5 time(s) in 5 post(s)
In my professional opinion (I work in this industry) I would say that plasma HDTVs currently and most likely always will deliver the highest picture quality and best 3D experience. To get technical briefly.. plasmas manipulate light by electrically charging gas-filled cells. LCDs utilize both liquid crystals and CCFLs/LEDs to control what is displayed. Plasmas can manipulate pixels much faster than LCDs, on average they're about 40x faster. This makes them ideal for 3D content, or any sort of motion really.

mordinxx wrote:
Plasmas ... use a lot of power compared to LCD/LED.
This is actually a common misconception. In actuality new plasma TVs will use about the same or even less power than the average LCD. LED back-lit LCDs would use slightly less power. The power rating sticker on the back of the set only shows the maximum possible power consumption for the unit. With LCD/LED the backlight is always on, everywhere (except with local dimming on some LEDs). So their power consumption is directly related to the level the backlight is set to. With plasmas the max power rating is only reached if the TV is set to it's brightest mode and is displaying a full pure white screen. With calibrated settings a dark scene in a movie could be using at little as 5% of the max power rating on plasmas.

Thryon wrote:
If you are getting an LED, make sure you get a local dimming LED and not and Edge Lit LED.
Local dimming is a panel technology, not a construction method. You cannot get local dimming on an edge-lit LED model, but you can get a back-lit LED without local dimming. This feature is usually reserved for a brand's flagship model or series of LED based LCD HDTVs.

If I were in the market for the best 3D TV experience now, or even the most high-end 2D display, I would look no further than the VT25 series by Panasonic. If that's a little outside of your price range you can check out their GT25 series, which is also a stellar performer. You'll find that plasma TVs are now generally cheaper than LED back-lit LCDs, making them all the more appealing. Their only real weakness is brightly lit rooms. Due to the technology they must use glass screens, and this is not good for reflections. LCDs aren't glare-free, but they do a much better job of diffusing and absorbing reflections.

In all honesty I would hold out on 3D for now. The sets are only going to get cheaper, and content is extremely sparse at the moment. 18 months from now you'll see 10x the 3D content, and equipment at roughly half the price of today's models. Whether or not it's worth it to hold up is up to you. True glasses-free 3D is still at least another 5 years off, more likely 8-10.

That's just my $0.02 on the matter. 29

1 user thanked Silent Paradigm for this useful post.
MyMoniker on 20/06/2011(UTC)
newoutlaw929
#7 Posted : January 30, 2011 4:05:11 AM(UTC)
newoutlaw929


Lunatic
Posts: 121
Thanks everybody, the Panasonic VT25 was the one I was leaning the most towards. I will message later with my final decision.
newoutlaw929
#8 Posted : January 31, 2011 8:44:03 AM(UTC)
newoutlaw929


Lunatic
Posts: 121
Hey guys me again, Another question. What do you guys know about the Mitsubishi DLP TVs. Walmart.com has 73"DLP for under $1500. Tried digging for info and it all seems good except that you may need to replace a bulb from time to time. People are actually saying they are better but I dont know
thryon
#9 Posted : January 31, 2011 9:19:52 AM(UTC)
thryon


Therapeutic Supervisors
Posts: 3,528
Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 4 time(s) in 4 post(s)
DLP sets do have incredible colours and deep blacks and can be had for quite cheap. But there are some issues you should take into account.

The first is what is known as "the rainbow effect". Some people can see the seperation of the 3 main colours (red, blue and green) when the action gets hectic or when they turn their heads quickly. This problem was for the most part resolved a few generations ago, some people are still affected by it.

DLP does require frequent lamp changes. Well frequent when compared to LCD that is. An average lamp can last somewhere between 2000-3000 hours, with some newer lamps lasting up to 6000 hours.

DLP sets also suffer from viewing angle issues. While wide angle is quite good, the set will need to be at eye level to appear fine.

Finally DLP TVs are also quite a bit larger and heavier than and LCD or plasma.

My projector is a DLP and I love it, but I am not sure I would use it for an everyday TV.
Silent Paradigm
#10 Posted : January 31, 2011 10:41:53 AM(UTC)
Silent Paradigm


Deranged
Posts: 291
Thanks: 7 times
Was thanked: 5 time(s) in 5 post(s)
I would stay away from DLP rear projection TVs. I recently sold my old Samsung DLP on Kijiji and I'm glad to be rid of it. The picture was great.. 6 years ago, now everyone but Mitsubishi has abandoned the technology altogether (for rear projection at least).

3D on a DLP display is really nothing like it is on a new LCD or plasma. The DLPs use the "checkerboard" 3D method, which effectively cuts the resolution in half for 3D content.

Picture quality on a rear projection DLP is another area of disappointment. As Thryon mentioned some viewers can see a "rainbow effect" during motion or simply by moving their eyes from the centre of the screen. I definitely noticed this on my old TV. DLPs generally produce a softer image than other TVs, since they don't have a fixed resolution. Colour can be very good on a DLP when properly calibrated, but black levels are almost always quite disappointing.

I don't know what you're budget is, but if you want a big screen that's 3D capable and you'll willing to shell out a fair amount of coin you could look into 3D front projectors. JVC has a new one, the DLA-X3, which uses LCoS (liquid crystal on silicon) technology. At around $4,500 it's not exactly cheap, but you get what you pay for.
Dalamornight
#11 Posted : February 4, 2011 4:06:16 AM(UTC)
Dalamornight


Therapeutic Supervisors
Posts: 1,474
Thanks: 1 times
I just bought a new 50' Panasonic plasma(under $1000) and man I love it, had the 42' version before that and no issue at all with either... moved the 42 into the bed room. It's also the new power and the 600 refresh games look fantastic on it ...
D.

Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

 
 
 
Copyright 2010 by Xbox360Asylum.ca